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How to Find What Your “Passion” Is

January 26th, 2015

August 23rd

You have probably been told since you were very young that you need to find out what your “passion” is and then make it the focus of your life, especially your working life. And if you are like most people, you are still searching for the answer, and fairly convinced it has nothing to do with your current job.

It’s a big question, and the answer is undeniably elusive, but you should never give up trying to find it. Below are some practical strategies that can help you get a deeper, truer sense of what you’re meant to do with your life.

Don’t be Afraid to Quit

For most people, finding their passion is a process of trial and error. That’s why it’s so important to know when something is just not the right fit, and be willing to leave it behind. It’s rare to hear someone encouraging quitting, but the longer you do something you don’t feel passionate about, the more you’re stuck doing it. Remember that you can’t find out what you truly want to do if all your time, energy, creativity, and focus is being sapped away by something you hate. Once you leave that dead end behind, there is nothing left to do but find a different, better path to follow.

Scrutinize Your Curiosity

What would you do if you had a billion dollars? Answering this question helps you think about what you would do with your life if you took away all limits. And it’s only by thinking in these terms that you can figure out what you are genuinely curious about. Setting aside all fears, hesitations, restrictions and expectations reveals your true interests, the things you would ideally dedicate your life to if you could. They may not be as unattainable as you realize.

Make Money a Secondary Concern

You might be rolling your eyes, but the simple fact is that finding and pursuing your passion often requires sacrifice. And if you are concerned first and foremost with making the most amount of money, you are severely limiting your options, and probably doomed to end up on a path you don’t want to follow. If you put those instincts on hold for a while, you are more likely to uncover your true passion and turn that into a lucrative and personally satisfying endeavor down the road.

Invest yourself in these strategies and you are well on your way to discovering your passion. Once you know where you’d rather be, it’s time to turn the dream into a reality with the premier boutique staffing firm in Westchester County. Find resources to help make you more agile and mobile in your professional life by relying on the team at The Concorde Group.

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Micro-Management: Does it Work for Your Team?

January 12th, 2015

Micro-management gets a bad reputation, but it’s only partly deserved. The simple fact is that micro-management, like all management styles/strategies/philosophies, works in some scenarios, and doesn’t work in others. Before you commit to it, or reject it, it’s important for you to consider the effect it will have on your team. Ask yourself these questions to determine if this is a strategy to embrace or avoid.

How Long Has Your Team Been Together?

If you team has had the same makeup for years and demonstrated a long track record of success, there is probably no reason for you to get more hands on. Conversely, if you have just assembled a new team, added a crop of new members, or otherwise made a consequential change, it might be helpful to get more involved.

How Large is Your Team?

Keep in mind that on some teams micro-management is simply logistically impossible. If you oversee a lot of people, or have multiple projects running simultaneously, there is no way to be a part of every process. You simply waste your efforts, and the people/projects you do focus on could feel like they are under unfair scrutiny. Micro-management works much better on smaller teams where your efforts can have a real impact.

What Timeline is Your Team Working on?

Some timelines are diffuse and open-ended, while others require strict adherence to deadlines and a careful commitment to a schedule. In the case of the latter scenario, a micro-management approach can be beneficial. Since your team members are occupied with their responsibilities, it’s up to you to make sure they are meeting daily/weekly/monthly benchmarks. If the schedule demands less precision, take a step back and let your team work at their own pace.

How is Morale on Your Team?

If morale on your team is low, you might try to rectify the problem by getting more closely involved. This is almost always a mistake. Your employees will likely feel patronized, and you probably won’t address the underlying cause of the issue. Make motivation your priority instead, and take a hard look at the culture that exists on your team and throughout your office.

How Will Micro-Management Affect You?

Micro-management takes a lot of time, focus, and attention to detail. Be aware of the effect this has on your performance as manager. You might get wrapped up in the specifics and comprise your ability to lead, forecast, strategize, and inspire. If your team thrives under the leadership of a bold, visionary, big-picture type of manager, switching to a micro-management style will only sacrifice what made you successful.

Find more resources designed to help you manage more efficently, effectively, and strategically by contacting The Concorde Group.

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