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Red Flags to Watch for on a Resume

June 29th, 2015

Evaluating a resume is something of an art form. You have to look past the candidate’s skills and experience and really analyze the information they have chosen to present you with. Hone your skills even further by learning about subtle red flags to watch out for.

  • Too Much Employment – If a candidate has demonstrated a pattern of jumping from job to job every year or two, it suggests they are discontent in their career and unlikely to show your company any meaningful loyalty.
  • A Lie – Sometimes a lie can be spotted simply by looking for contradictory information on a resume. If one is present, it raises serious questions about that candidate’s character and the true nature of their credentials.
  • Meaningless Skills – In 2015, every professional is proficient in Microsoft Office. If you read a resume that lists this as one of the candidate’s skills, it means they are trying to pad out their qualifications and probably can’t make the big impact you want.
  • Focus on Strategy – Strategy is an overused buzzword that appears a shocking number of times on some resumes. You are interested in accomplishments, not approaches.
  • Claims of Expertise – True experts don’t go out looking for jobs; they get recruited by the top global companies. This word indicates that the candidate’s proficiency has probably been greatly exaggerated.
  • Outdated Email Addresses – Today’s business requires nimble adaptability. Candidates still using outdated email platforms probably can’t adapt as quickly as you would like.
  • Inputs Over Outputs – When a resume lists a candidate’s job responsibilities and project participation and fails to mention the outcomes of those, it should make you question what kind of value they can really bring to your company.
  • An Objective Statement – These statement’s can only state the obvious – I want a job at your company – or the irrelevant – I want something besides a job at your company. The presence of one is evidence of a poorly crafted resume.
  • An Extended History – Jobs or internships the candidate had a decade ago are probably irrelevant to the position they’re seeking now. Resumes that look too far into the past suggest the candidate is struggling to align their qualifications with your requirements.

Think back – how many resumes have you seen with these red flags on them? Did you invite those candidates for interviews, and did you end up hiring any of them? Possibly yes, but more likely no. Now that you know how to spot these warning signs early, you can streamline your recruiting process and connect with only the best possible candidates. Further improve your staffing strategies by contacting The Concorde Group.

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5 Tips to Develop Yourself Professionally

June 15th, 2015

Want to know the single best way to get better jobs at better companies with higher compensation? Make professional development an ongoing priority. The skills you learn in school and on the job are not enough to keep pace with the rate of change in today’s business world. If you want to stay ahead of the curve and always be an asset, you have to be proactive and dedicate some of your own time to the cause. Here are five tips to help you get more out of your professional development efforts:

Look for Resources

There are tons of available resources to help you develop professionally. Start by finding out if your current employer offers tuition reimbursement, incentives for picking up certifications, or flexible scheduling while you are pursuing schooling. Then expand your search to identify the courses, programs, seminars, conferences, and professional networks that can aid your professional growth.

Join a Professional Organization

One of the primary missions of many professional organizations is to help their members expand their skill sets. These organizations regularly offer opportunities for members to interact, collaborate, and exchange training. Joining one or more of these organizations provides you with a lot of valuable assets and can give your professional development efforts more form and function than they would have otherwise.

Accept New Challenges

You can do a lot to develop yourself professionally by simply accepting new types of assignments at work. Let your boss know about your intentions and he will be much more likely to accommodate you. Not only does this help you pick up new skills and insights, it also helps improve your standing at your current job and highlights your professional ambitions.

Create a Plan

Since professional development is ongoing, it helps to be systematic about it so that you stay on course. Create a plan for yourself that lists your professional goals in a year, three years, five years, 10 years and so on. Then assign yourself benchmarks, and plan out the steps you will take at each interval to make sure you are on track to reach the next one. Make sure you regularly review this plan, track your progress, and avoid making compromises.

Take on a Mentor

Professional mentors take many forms. It could be someone who had an identical job to yours, a related job, or simply someone who had a successful career. In any form, they can give you guidance and advice based on their own experience. They can also offer you a valuable outsider perspective on your own career, and hold you accountable when mistakes or setbacks occur.

Professional development is step one. Capitalizing on it is step two. When are ready to make the most of the time and effort you’ve put in, contact The Concorde Group.

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