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How to Properly Deal with the Counteroffer

August 31st, 2015

Dealing with a counteroffer can be one of the most challenging parts of the recruiting process for a job seeker, which is something of a paradox. You’ve been looking for a job, and now more than one company wants to work with you. It should be cause for celebration, but often it just produces stress and anxiety. After all, you want to make sure you pick the right company, but it’s not always easy to choose. If you find yourself in this situation, use these strategies.

Determine What You Really Want

Ultimately, your objective is to find the right position for your long-term personal and professional goals. So what features would help you get to where you want to be in your career? Are you looking for more money, more advancement potential, more interesting work, or more flexible scheduling options? It’s unlikely that any one job can offer you all of these, so pick your priorities and examine each offer in those terms.

Don’t Start a Bidding War

It can be tempting to try and play both sides against each other to get more money, better benefits, or a more esteemed job title. In practice, however, this is always a bad idea. It takes a fair amount of cunning and strategizing, and if you overplay your hand, you might end up losing both offers. That being said, if you have multiple offers on the table, you should make that known to each of the hiring managers you’re working with.

Understand the Consequences

If you already have a job and another company is trying to lure you away with a counteroffer, there can be serious consequences if you accept a promotion or raise and agree to stay where you are. You may have gotten more, but now your employer will always question your loyalty and may begin to push you to the margins of the company, whether consciously or unconsciously. A seemingly rosy situation can quickly turn into a workplace nightmare.

Remain Professional and Gracious

Any time a counteroffer gets thrown out, there will end up being a winner and a loser in the end. Make sure you don’t gloat or disrespect the company you end up turning down. That kind of behavior is petty and unprofessional, and there is no reason for you to burn bridges. If they were eager to recruit you now they may be eager to recruit you in the future.

If your goal is to make the smartest possible choices for your career, rely on the recruiting experts at The Concorde Group.

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Am I Ready for a Career Change?

May 28th, 2015

These days it’s common for people to bounce between companies, move to a new city for work, and even change career several times over the course of their working life. Unfortunately, it’s always difficult to know if now is the time to make a big change or to stay where you are. If you are feeling restless and thinking of doing something entirely different, ask yourself the following questions to determine if this is the right time for a bold move:

Is Work Taking a Toll on You Mentally and Physically?

No one expects work to be a walk in the park. But that doesn’t mean you should come home every day feeling exhausted, depressed, and even in pain. The cause could be something besides the office, however, you spend a huge amount of time working, and it has an inevitable effect on your health. If it’s starting to run you into the ground, it’s probably time to look for other opportunities.

Are Your Skills Out of Step with Your Personality?

We all go to work out of necessity, and most of us strive to be good at what we do. And it’s possible to become really good at something you don’t particularly like doing. Things might be fine now, but over time this internal struggle will start to affect your performance and your mood. Before that happens, think of moving on to something you genuinely like doing, even if you’re not very good at it initially.

Is Your Salary No Longer Enough?

The biggest obstacle to making a career change is giving up a steady source of income and embracing financial uncertainty. But if you have reached the point in your career where no amount of salary, benefits, or perks can make you happy with what you are doing, it’s time rethink your priorities, and your career.

Do You Feel Like Your True Talents Are Wasted?

They say that each of us has a gift, and by and large, it’s true. Unfortunately, most of us don’t get to apply those gifts to our working life. Over time, that can lead you to feel that you are wasting your time, spinning your wheels, and living entirely for the short term. If you have a true talent or passion and you feel like it’s being squandered in your current position, it’s probably time to move on.

Changing the course of your career is a lot easier if you have a partner to help point you in the direction you would rather be heading. Think long and hard about what you want to do next, and then contact The Concorde Group to learn about jobs in Fairfield County and more!

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Should You Include a Temp Job on a Resume?

April 28th, 2015

In recent years, companies have increasingly relied on temporary or contract employees to fill holes in their workforce. Over those same years, a tough job market drove many professionals to take on temporary positions. That means there are a lot of job seekers with temporary experience in their past who are wondering if it belongs on their resume.

The short answer is yes. A temporary job is still a job, and you can pick up a lot of valuable skills and experiences spending just a few weeks or months with a company. And since so many companies have turned to temporary workers, they understand this as well as you do.

It’s important, however, to put this experience into context and frame it appropriately on your resume. You can leverage these positions to bolster your credentials but only if you are honest about the nature of the job. Use these tips to cover your bases:

Decide on a Grouping

You can either list all of your temporary positions together under one heading marked “Temporary Jobs,” or elect to discuss each one separately. If you have worked a lot of temporary jobs and mostly want to demonstrate that you have been keeping busy, collecting them together makes more sense. But if you have worked temporarily for a major company in your industry, or had a responsibility that is particularly worth highlighting, it’s perfectly appropriate to single this one job out.

Filter Your Experience

Hiring managers don’t want to waste time reading about experiences that are irrelevant to the position they are trying to fill. If your temporary experience was especially varied, avoid mentioning the positions that have nothing to do with the one you are seeking now. For instance, if you worked as a construction laborer for a few weeks it won’t help you get a job in an office.

Format Correctly

When listing temporary positions on your resume, write down the staffing agency you worked through, the company you worked for, your title, and the dates of employment. Then be sure to designate that this was a temporary position. If you didn’t get the job through a staffing agency, don’t hesitate to characterize yourself as a consultant or freelancer. This can help establish your industry authority.

Highlight Your Achievements

Even temporary workers make a contribution to the company. If there are any achievements you can point to, be sure to highlight them. Just make sure you are not stretching the truth or exaggerating your role. Whenever possible try to cite specific metrics, and be sure to focus on high points that are relevant to the position you’re seeking.

Every detail of your resume must be carefully considered and closely scrutinized. It’s not an easy process. Get the help you need to optimize your resume and your job search by working with The Concorde Group.

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How to Look for a New Job While Still Working At Your Old One

December 16th, 2014

Looking for a job while also working full or part time can seem like a daunting proposal. But looking for a job with no income coming in at all is probably even harder. Luckily, there are ways to stay at the job you have currently while effectively and discreetly looking for something new. Rely on these strategies:

Continue to Excel

Don’t let your performance at your current job slip just because you’ve decided to move on. Continue showing up on time, working hard, and accepting extra work. You don’t want to risk losing your job unexpectedly, and you might later be relying on your boss to give you a recommendation.

Keep Your Job Search at Home

Don’t conduct any part of your job search on company time, at the office, or on a company computer. You might face penalties from your employer if you are caught. Plus, it’s harder to search for a job when you are trying to be sneaky.

Stay Off Social Media

Don’t broadcast that you are searching for a job on social media, even if your boss and coworkers are not in your network of friends. This kind of information has a way of spreading unintentionally, and, again, you could face penalties if your employer finds out.

Revise Your Reference List

Make sure that your current employer is not on your list of references. It is appropriate to include them after your have left the position, but not while you are still employed. If you need someone to speak to your recent professional performance, consider enlisting a trusted coworker.

Dress Appropriately

Many job seekers make the mistake of wearing a suit to a casual office on a day when they have a secret afternoon job interview. Make sure that you don’t accidentally reveal your intentions by changing your routine.

Be Honest if Caught

If your boss does find out that you are looking for a job, be honest with them. If you lie, it could damage your credibility and reputation. Explain the situation honestly, and assure your superior that your search is not jeopardizing your current responsibilities.

Schedule Appropriately

As much as possible, try to schedule phone and face-to-face interviews during non-working hours. If necessary, take a personal day. Trying to fit a secret interview into your workday creates extra stress that only degrades your performance.

Finally, if you do get a new job, make sure that you give the job you are leaving the customary two weeks notice. Just because you are moving on doesn’t mean you can disregard basic professional courtesies. Once your job search starts, partner with Concorde Staffing Group to find more of the vacancies you are looking for.

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You Just Got a Job! Now What?

November 24th, 2014

The job search process is often long, stressful, and exhausting. When do you finally get an offer, it’s easy to conclude that your work is done and that you can simply relax and settle into your new position. The reality, however, is that your work is just beginning, and if you take your foot off the gas now you jeopardize your long-term employment prospects. Follow these tips to help you get the most from your time right after you get a job.

Establish Positive Relationships

You are making a first impression on everyone at your new job. Make sure that it’s a positive one. Be outgoing, make the effort to introduce yourself, and strive to be open, honest, and clear in all your interactions.

Produce Results

You have a lot to prove in your first weeks and month on the job. Establish yourself as a person who delivers on promises, meets deadlines, and produces tangible results. It is not unreasonable to keep a “success file” tracking your early accomplishments.

Be Ambitious

Don’t be afraid to take on and even seek out extra responsibilities. These show your superiors that you are a value to the company and that you have even more to offer than expected. Just make sure you don’t comprise your core responsibilities by taking on new ones.

Build Your Network

Get to know your coworkers, your superiors, and all the people below you including the security guard, the IT guy and the people in other departments. The stronger and wider your network, the more resources you have to draw on when you need information or assistance.

Create a Plan and Review it

Make a “personal development plan” for yourself that accounts for your short, medium, and long-term goals. This can help you better align the work you’re doing with your personal and professional ambitions. Review and update this plan regularly.

Fine Tune Your Job Description

Sometime within the first 90 days, sit down with your manger and review your job description in the context of your early experiences. Try to fine tune the details so that you and your manager are on the same page about what’s expected of you.

Maintain Balance

It’s easy to throw yourself into a new job, but make sure that you maintain some kind of work/life balance. If not, you risk burning out, or creating expectations for yourself that you can’t deliver on over the long term.

Remember that the impression you make in the first stages of a new job is one that will stick with you throughout your entire period of employment. Look great from the start, and you’ll ultimately rise higher, faster. Find more resources to help you further your career by working with the professionals at The Concorde Group.

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Is the Job You’re Applying for a Good Fit?

September 30th, 2014

When you’re looking for a job, it’s easy to reach a point when you are willing to apply for anything and everything. But in your urgency to find something, anything, you might end up applying with companies that are a bad fit for your skills and long-term goals. Remember, the point isn’t just to find a job, it’s to find a great job that you can imagine sticking with. Use these strategies to assess if the position you’re applying for is a good fit.

Examine the Compensation

Ultimately, you go to work to make money. If the position you’re applying for does not compensate you enough to live the lifestyle you require, it’s only going to cause stress down the road. Consider the entire compensation package, too. The salary might be enough, but if you rely on having medical benefits that your future employer can’t offer, it will make it hard to stick with the company.

Consider Your Aptitude

It’s great to be ambitious and to strive for higher plateaus, but if you find that you are offered a position that you are woefully unqualified for, it’s only going to cause problems. You will feel constantly stressed and have to deal with an embarrassing string of disappointments. Your employer will also notice your mistakes and question your future with the company.

Factor in Your Family

You may be the one going to the office everyday, but your job affects your entire family and everyone who depends on you. Jobs that require lots of travel, long hours, or exposure to dangerous environments can place a serious strain on your family. Be sure to consider their needs before you accept a position. If you are single, think about how the position will affect your ability to start a family in the future.

Gauge Your Level of Excitement

If you have been out of work for a while, it’s tempting to jump at the first position offered to you. But if you don’t feel an ounce of excitement about the job responsibilities, the office environment, or your chances for advancement, it’s going to be very hard to come to work every morning. Earning a regular paycheck is great, but not if it makes you miserable.

Find a Job You Can Believe in

Before you accept a job, ask yourself if you believe in the mission of the company, the quality of the work they do, the way they treat their employees, and their position in the community. Lots of people work for companies that don’t meet all these criteria, but if you can find a company that does, you are much more likely to stick with them long term. You can’t wait forever to find the ideal position, but don’t toss all your values aside in your scramble to get hired on with somebody.

Finding a job isn’t easy, and finding the perfect job is even harder. Access resources that can help your search by contacting The Concorde Group.

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5 Tips for an Improved Temporary Employment Cover Letter

December 23rd, 2013

Looking for a new job, whether full-time or temporary, is a time-consuming task. Putting together resumes and cover letters requires your full attention to detail. You have to make sure that there are no mistakes on either document, plus that all of the information is factual. When it comes to applying for a temporary job in NY or CT, you should tailor your cover letter accordingly. Do not submit the same cover letter you would send out for a full-time position.

#1 – Tailor the Cover Letter to the Specified Job

Our first tip is to create the temp cover letter to match the specific job for which you are applying. This will show the recruiter or hiring manager that you have taken the time to craft the letter and are being personal. The cover letter needs to mention the job title at the beginning and should have any work experience removed that does not match the needs of the position that is being advertised.

#2 – Describe Your Temporary Work

The middle of the cover letter for a temporary position should include descriptions of the temporary work you have performed in the past. This information needs to include the location of the previous positions, the type of the work, the salary you earned, the industry in which you worked, the name of the company and any other pertinent information you deem necessary to the application.

#3 – Short, Sweet, and to the Point

It has been mentioned in the past that cover letters need to be short, no longer than one page, but we really mean it here. With a temporary job, you will not have to explain as much about your prior work experience compared to applying for a full-time position. This type of cover letter can be kept to anywhere from two to three paragraphs long instead of the normal three to five paragraphs. The letter still needs to be professional, courteous, and free of spelling and grammar errors to catch the attention of the hiring manager.

#4 – Close the Letter with an Accomplishment

If you have been working with a staffing agency while looking for temporary work you can close your cover letter with an accomplishment. The accomplishment can define anything you have succeeded at during your history of temporary employment. For example, you can let the hiring managers know that you are the most requested temp employee at the agency.

#5 – Double-Check for Proper Flow

Once you have finished writing the letter, check to make sure that it flows from start to finish. The opening and concluding paragraphs need to flow with the body paragraph so all of the information being presented is related and targets the requirements posted in the company’s job advertisement.

If you are looking for recruiters in Fairfield County CT, contact us today.

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3 Ways to Turn a Temp Position into a Permanent Job

November 25th, 2013

As the economy rebounds, many working professionals are finding permanent career opportunities via temporary assignments. Temping can be a great way to build a career path while keeping skills fresh in a regular assignment. Yet, as the weeks go on and the temp contract comes to an end, there are some steps you can take to secure permanent employment at the company if you choose. Use these 3 ways to successfully turn your temp position into a permanent job.

  1. Indicate as soon as possible your interest in permanent employment.

When you accept a temporary assignment, it’s assumed that you are happy to work for the length of time that the contract indicates. However, many temps automatically think that the temp job will turn into a perm one, which is not the case. If you are genuinely interested in becoming a permanent employee with the company you are assigned to, then you must speak up. Let the recruiter and the on-site HR manager know you would like to be considered for perm placement in your present assignment or in another related employment opportunity there.

  1. Be punctual, professional, and productive on the temp assignment.

As a temp, you have to work twice as hard to impress the management team at your assignment. Therefore, you will want to be sure to arrive to work early or on time every day. Dress very smartly and conduct yourself in a highly professional manner at all times to stand out from other temps. Complete all assigned tasks, provide quality work, and ask for projects when you have time to spare. Demonstrate your worth to the employer to be thought of as someone that has potential. The harder you work, the more likely you are to be recommended for a permanent job when one comes along.

  1. Find ways to blend in with the team and the corporate culture.

Temps often feel left out or ostracized in some ways by permanent employees while on assignment. Don’t fall into this way of thinking. Instead, look for every opportunity to blend in with the rest of the team by being a participant and getting along with others. Respect perm employees and they will return the favor. Learn what the corporate culture is all about and do your best to become part of it. Dress and act the part at all times. Be someone that others can rely on to get the job done well. Claim the job you want by understanding how your role as a temp contributes to the success of the company.

While these are just a handful of ways you can support your goal of becoming a permanent member of the team, your focus should always be on providing superior results and a good attitude about your work as a temp.

If you are looking for temporary jobs in Westchester NY, contact Concorde Personnel today.

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How to Include Temporary Assignments on Your Resume

October 22nd, 2013

Temporary and short-term assignments are great in the beginning of your career or when you are looking to change careers, because they provide you with valid work experience. Unfortunately, it can be somewhat difficult to list them on your resume – in a way that makes sense to recruiters. If you have worked only one or two temporary jobs, it is a little easier to list them. But when you have a handful of assignments that were all short term, it gets more difficult. Here are some tips for including them on your resume.

List the Agency as Your Employer

If you worked multiple assignments for a single temporary agency, include the temporary agency’s name first. This is who you worked for, who provided you with temporary assignments, and who paid you. They are the company that is going to come up on your background check. While you probably worked for multiple companies, you were not employed by them. You were employed by the temporary agency, so that is who should be listed on your resume.

List the Job Titles

After listing the agency you worked for, make a list of job titles you held. If you had just one type of position through different temporary assignments, you only need to list it once. However, many temporary agencies place you with slightly different job titles, such as “accounting assistant,” “data entry processor” or “payroll assistant.” While it takes approximately the same education and skills for these three positions, they are varied in the type of job titles. Enter them separately in the temporary agency section of your resume.

Detail Your Job Duties

Next, make a place on the resume where you detail the duties you completed. The clients you worked for are not as important as the type of assignments you had. This is where the interviewer or recruiter is going to verify your experience. Most recruiters don’t care as much about the fact that you were a temporary employee, but they do care about what kind of skills you acquired while employed. Be specific with what was expected of you in those positions.

The Length of Assignments

It also helps to provide the length of assignments and why they ended. Recruiters want to know the only reason you left those temporary assignments was because you were simply providing support for an extra project for a company or filling in for an employee who was ill or on maternity leave. It looks much better than if you say it wasn’t the right fit or you didn’t like the assignment. Your temporary agency will be your primary reference for these assignments, so they will also be able to answer these questions when the recruiter calls to verify your employment.

You can also consider omitting this experience if the temporary assignments were very short (less than a week or two). Look at your overall resume and the experience included. If the temporary assignments didn’t provide much experience compared to other jobs you have had, or if they are unrelated to the types of full-time work you desire, consider not including them.

If you are looking for Fairfield CT recruiting agencies, contact Concorde today.

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4 Ways to Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stand Out

September 24th, 2013

When you are on the prowl for a new job, using LinkedIn can be a positive way to get in front of more hiring companies. According to a 2013 Jobvite survey of over 1,000 companies, 94 percent of employers use or plan to use social networks for recruiting purposes. If you are not actively looking for work on LinkedIn, then you could be missing out on a large market of interested employers. The key is to create a presence on LinkedIn that will help you stand out in a positive way.

Developing a Better LinkedIn Profile as a Job Seeker

There are some ways to make your LinkedIn profile shine as a job seeker. While this will take a little time to manage, it’s well worth the effort. Here are four ways to create an outstanding LinkedIn profile.

  1. Add a professional image.  Many scientific studies have shown that people form an initial opinion of you within 10-seconds of seeing you either in person or via a photo. Therefore you will want to take the time to get a photographer to take your head shot photo and choose the best image for your profile. It should speak to your industry and the way you want others to think of you. Avoid any pictures that could be misinterpreted or are poor quality.
  2. Create a keyword focused description. When searching for candidates for open assignments, recruiters will often use the built-in search engine on LinkedIn to pinpoint members who may be a good fit. This means you will want to include keywords in your description that puts you in front of recruiters during the search process. Refer to the industry terms and assignment keywords found in the LinkedIn job section.
  3. Provide relevant career and educational data. Your LinkedIn profile is not meant to be a complete online resume. Instead, it should be a general outline and listing of the work achievements you’ve accomplished. Focus on just the last 10-15 years of your work history and then create short descriptions of your roles and any awards or recognition you’ve received. Share links to your professional portfolio, projects you’ve completed, and any websites/blogs you own. Save the smaller details for any interviews you may be invited to.
  4. Get endorsed and recommended by peers. A powerful way to build a better LinkedIn profile is to gather as many written recommendations and endorsements you can from your peers and any past employers. LinkedIn makes this easier for members as there is an automatic list of people to endorse upon login. You can give yourself a boost by recommending and endorsing others and then asking for that in return.

There’s a reason why nearly 300 million people are connecting on LinkedIn as of this article. Take the time to develop a killer profile and you’ll have a much better chance at getting noticed by the best hiring managers and that much closer to your dream job.

Enjoy some previous posts from Concorde Personnel on using social media as part of a job search:

Is Your Networking Helping or Hurting?

Stay Connected to Your Job Networks Without Being a Pest

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