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Is the Job You’re Applying for a Good Fit?

September 30th, 2014

When you’re looking for a job, it’s easy to reach a point when you are willing to apply for anything and everything. But in your urgency to find something, anything, you might end up applying with companies that are a bad fit for your skills and long-term goals. Remember, the point isn’t just to find a job, it’s to find a great job that you can imagine sticking with. Use these strategies to assess if the position you’re applying for is a good fit.

Examine the Compensation

Ultimately, you go to work to make money. If the position you’re applying for does not compensate you enough to live the lifestyle you require, it’s only going to cause stress down the road. Consider the entire compensation package, too. The salary might be enough, but if you rely on having medical benefits that your future employer can’t offer, it will make it hard to stick with the company.

Consider Your Aptitude

It’s great to be ambitious and to strive for higher plateaus, but if you find that you are offered a position that you are woefully unqualified for, it’s only going to cause problems. You will feel constantly stressed and have to deal with an embarrassing string of disappointments. Your employer will also notice your mistakes and question your future with the company.

Factor in Your Family

You may be the one going to the office everyday, but your job affects your entire family and everyone who depends on you. Jobs that require lots of travel, long hours, or exposure to dangerous environments can place a serious strain on your family. Be sure to consider their needs before you accept a position. If you are single, think about how the position will affect your ability to start a family in the future.

Gauge Your Level of Excitement

If you have been out of work for a while, it’s tempting to jump at the first position offered to you. But if you don’t feel an ounce of excitement about the job responsibilities, the office environment, or your chances for advancement, it’s going to be very hard to come to work every morning. Earning a regular paycheck is great, but not if it makes you miserable.

Find a Job You Can Believe in

Before you accept a job, ask yourself if you believe in the mission of the company, the quality of the work they do, the way they treat their employees, and their position in the community. Lots of people work for companies that don’t meet all these criteria, but if you can find a company that does, you are much more likely to stick with them long term. You can’t wait forever to find the ideal position, but don’t toss all your values aside in your scramble to get hired on with somebody.

Finding a job isn’t easy, and finding the perfect job is even harder. Access resources that can help your search by contacting The Concorde Group.

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Common Interview Questions You Will Face and How to Answer Them

August 28th, 2014

A face-to-face interview is typically the final step in the recruitment process, and it can make or break your chances of getting the job. There is no way to know for sure what you will be asked, but it’s still important to prepare in advance. These are examples of some common interview questions and the answers that the hiring manager will want to hear.

Experience

“Tell me about your past working experience?”

Employers want to know not just where you have worked in the past, but also the specifics of what you did, how that relates to the current position you are applying for, and why you left the position.

When you are asked this question, be sure to highlight the responsibilities from your past that most relate to the position you are applying for. If you have been fired from a past job, make that information  known honestly, but stress that you have moved beyond the mistakes of your past.

Accomplishment

“What has been your biggest working accomplishment”

Companies don’t just want to hire people that will show up everyday and do the minimum that is required of them. They are looking for recruits that will rise over and above to get things done.

Show off the moments in which you did more than was asked of you, did things faster than was asked of you, overcame unexpected obstacles, and helped your coworkers, subordinates, and superiors to be more exceptional than anyone was counting on.

Weakness

“Describe your biggest weakness as an employee”

It’s never easy to highlight the things that you are not good at, but employers want to be aware of any potential red flags, and to know about the less dynamic aspects of your abilities.

When you are asked this question, avoid giving a patently false and flattering response. Saying that “I work too hard” will only invite the ire of the hiring manager. Instead, honestly identify the things that you struggle with, but try to frame them as a positive trait, and something that consistently motivates you to be better at what you do.

Value

“If hired, how will you contribute more to this company than any other candidate”

More than anything, companies want to know why you are the absolute best fit for a vacancy, and how you will contribute more than all the other candidates they are considering.

Think about the skills and past experiences that most apply to the position in question, and find ways to describe them that will apply to the current needs of the company. This is the point when you need to frame your past as an asset for the future.

Ask yourself these common interview questions in advance, and you will have more polished and decisive answers to deliver during the high-stress interview situation. For more tips about impressing today’s hiring managers, partner with the team at The Concorde Group.

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5 Ways To Improve Your Resume To Make it Great

July 30th, 2014

Put yourself in the shoes of a hiring manager. You announce a job opening and all of a sudden your office is flooded with hundreds of resumes. It’s your job to read through each one, but they are all so bland, similar, and underwhelming that they start to run together. By the end, you can’t say for sure if the right candidate is anywhere in the pile.

If you are looking for a job, your resume is how you introduce yourself. Unfortunately, most resumes make a bad first impression. You might be the perfect person for the job, but if your resume doesn’t scream that out, there is no way for a hiring manager to pick you out of the crowd. Make sure you don’t get overlooked by including these to improve your resume every time you send out.

Be Concise

This tip is more important than any other, and it’s really more about what you shouldn’t include. The average resume only gets scanned for 30 seconds. If you can’t present the most impressive and relevant details about yourself in that amount of time, you are wasting an opportunity. Revise your resume over and over until it includes only the most essential details, and make sure that it is formatted in a way that is easy to scan and digest.

Career Objective

Why are you applying for this job? What is the number one thing that makes you qualified? What do you have to contribute specifically? A career objective summarizes all of this into a single sentence that you include at the top of your resume. Be creative, honest, and personal, and you can grab a hiring manager’s attention from the very start.

Skills and Capabilities

Too many job seekers make education and job experience the focus of their resume rather than skills and capabilities. Hiring managers don’t care what you’ve done in the past, they care what you can do in the future. Listing your experience points the focus backward. Listing your skills and capabilities points it forward.

Provable Accomplishments

All hiring managers are looking for recruits that can see a project through to the end and rise above expectations. Include any notable professional success on your resume, and be sure that they are tied to clear and verifiable metrics.

Reference Section

All resumes should have a section for references, but instead of writing out names and phone numbers, simply write “references available upon request.” Hiring managers want to know they can contact personal and professional references, but including the contact information on your resume is an unnecessary waste of space.

Even if you follow all these tips, crafting a great resume isn’t easy. It takes a lot of time, thought, revision, and frustration. But simply making the effort immediately sets you apart from a majority of other job seekers. Work with the team at The Concorde Group, and find more valuable job-seeking resources.

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