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How to Find What Your “Passion” Is

January 26th, 2015

August 23rd

You have probably been told since you were very young that you need to find out what your “passion” is and then make it the focus of your life, especially your working life. And if you are like most people, you are still searching for the answer, and fairly convinced it has nothing to do with your current job.

It’s a big question, and the answer is undeniably elusive, but you should never give up trying to find it. Below are some practical strategies that can help you get a deeper, truer sense of what you’re meant to do with your life.

Don’t be Afraid to Quit

For most people, finding their passion is a process of trial and error. That’s why it’s so important to know when something is just not the right fit, and be willing to leave it behind. It’s rare to hear someone encouraging quitting, but the longer you do something you don’t feel passionate about, the more you’re stuck doing it. Remember that you can’t find out what you truly want to do if all your time, energy, creativity, and focus is being sapped away by something you hate. Once you leave that dead end behind, there is nothing left to do but find a different, better path to follow.

Scrutinize Your Curiosity

What would you do if you had a billion dollars? Answering this question helps you think about what you would do with your life if you took away all limits. And it’s only by thinking in these terms that you can figure out what you are genuinely curious about. Setting aside all fears, hesitations, restrictions and expectations reveals your true interests, the things you would ideally dedicate your life to if you could. They may not be as unattainable as you realize.

Make Money a Secondary Concern

You might be rolling your eyes, but the simple fact is that finding and pursuing your passion often requires sacrifice. And if you are concerned first and foremost with making the most amount of money, you are severely limiting your options, and probably doomed to end up on a path you don’t want to follow. If you put those instincts on hold for a while, you are more likely to uncover your true passion and turn that into a lucrative and personally satisfying endeavor down the road.

Invest yourself in these strategies and you are well on your way to discovering your passion. Once you know where you’d rather be, it’s time to turn the dream into a reality with the premier boutique staffing firm in Westchester County. Find resources to help make you more agile and mobile in your professional life by relying on the team at The Concorde Group.

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Micro-Management: Does it Work for Your Team?

January 12th, 2015

Micro-management gets a bad reputation, but it’s only partly deserved. The simple fact is that micro-management, like all management styles/strategies/philosophies, works in some scenarios, and doesn’t work in others. Before you commit to it, or reject it, it’s important for you to consider the effect it will have on your team. Ask yourself these questions to determine if this is a strategy to embrace or avoid.

How Long Has Your Team Been Together?

If you team has had the same makeup for years and demonstrated a long track record of success, there is probably no reason for you to get more hands on. Conversely, if you have just assembled a new team, added a crop of new members, or otherwise made a consequential change, it might be helpful to get more involved.

How Large is Your Team?

Keep in mind that on some teams micro-management is simply logistically impossible. If you oversee a lot of people, or have multiple projects running simultaneously, there is no way to be a part of every process. You simply waste your efforts, and the people/projects you do focus on could feel like they are under unfair scrutiny. Micro-management works much better on smaller teams where your efforts can have a real impact.

What Timeline is Your Team Working on?

Some timelines are diffuse and open-ended, while others require strict adherence to deadlines and a careful commitment to a schedule. In the case of the latter scenario, a micro-management approach can be beneficial. Since your team members are occupied with their responsibilities, it’s up to you to make sure they are meeting daily/weekly/monthly benchmarks. If the schedule demands less precision, take a step back and let your team work at their own pace.

How is Morale on Your Team?

If morale on your team is low, you might try to rectify the problem by getting more closely involved. This is almost always a mistake. Your employees will likely feel patronized, and you probably won’t address the underlying cause of the issue. Make motivation your priority instead, and take a hard look at the culture that exists on your team and throughout your office.

How Will Micro-Management Affect You?

Micro-management takes a lot of time, focus, and attention to detail. Be aware of the effect this has on your performance as manager. You might get wrapped up in the specifics and comprise your ability to lead, forecast, strategize, and inspire. If your team thrives under the leadership of a bold, visionary, big-picture type of manager, switching to a micro-management style will only sacrifice what made you successful.

Find more resources designed to help you manage more efficently, effectively, and strategically by contacting The Concorde Group.

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How to Look for a New Job While Still Working At Your Old One

December 16th, 2014

Looking for a job while also working full or part time can seem like a daunting proposal. But looking for a job with no income coming in at all is probably even harder. Luckily, there are ways to stay at the job you have currently while effectively and discreetly looking for something new. Rely on these strategies:

Continue to Excel

Don’t let your performance at your current job slip just because you’ve decided to move on. Continue showing up on time, working hard, and accepting extra work. You don’t want to risk losing your job unexpectedly, and you might later be relying on your boss to give you a recommendation.

Keep Your Job Search at Home

Don’t conduct any part of your job search on company time, at the office, or on a company computer. You might face penalties from your employer if you are caught. Plus, it’s harder to search for a job when you are trying to be sneaky.

Stay Off Social Media

Don’t broadcast that you are searching for a job on social media, even if your boss and coworkers are not in your network of friends. This kind of information has a way of spreading unintentionally, and, again, you could face penalties if your employer finds out.

Revise Your Reference List

Make sure that your current employer is not on your list of references. It is appropriate to include them after your have left the position, but not while you are still employed. If you need someone to speak to your recent professional performance, consider enlisting a trusted coworker.

Dress Appropriately

Many job seekers make the mistake of wearing a suit to a casual office on a day when they have a secret afternoon job interview. Make sure that you don’t accidentally reveal your intentions by changing your routine.

Be Honest if Caught

If your boss does find out that you are looking for a job, be honest with them. If you lie, it could damage your credibility and reputation. Explain the situation honestly, and assure your superior that your search is not jeopardizing your current responsibilities.

Schedule Appropriately

As much as possible, try to schedule phone and face-to-face interviews during non-working hours. If necessary, take a personal day. Trying to fit a secret interview into your workday creates extra stress that only degrades your performance.

Finally, if you do get a new job, make sure that you give the job you are leaving the customary two weeks notice. Just because you are moving on doesn’t mean you can disregard basic professional courtesies. Once your job search starts, partner with Concorde Staffing Group to find more of the vacancies you are looking for.

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Full-Time or Temporary: Which Should You Choose?

November 10th, 2014

At first glace that title might seem ridiculous. What job seeker would take a temporary or contract position over a full-time job? But with the quality, quality, and variety of temporary positions growing all the time, an increasing number of employees is seeking out this kind of work rather than committing to a full-time position they feel less than passionate about. Explore the pros and cons of both options to help you decide which choice is right for you.

Full-Time

Pros

  • Stability – Full-time jobs guarantee you 40+ hours as long as you remain an asset to the company.
  • Benefits – Medical coverage, retirement plans, and tuition reimbursement are often benefits included in the compensation package offered to full-time employees.
  • Advancement – You have more opportunities, and more realistic opportunities for advancement working for one company over the long term.
  • Consistency – Full-time jobs typically ask you to handle the similar responsibilities, in the same place, with the same group of people, over and over. For some, that is an asset.
  • Prestige – Hiring managers typically privileged full-time employment over temporary employment when vetting a candidate’s work history.

Cons

  • Inflexibility – It can be harder to maintain a work/life balance within the confines of a full-time job.
  • Burnout – The stress, pressure, and repetition of full-time employment can contribute to employee burnout.
  • Commitment – If your life has been organized around a predictable full-time job, leaving that job can be much harder to do. Some employees feel stuck.
  • Politics – All offices have politics, and if you work in the same place for years they will affect you much more.

Temporary

Pros

  • Variety – Since temporary jobs are short term, employees have the opportunity to experience a wide variety of different responsibilities and workplaces.
  • Freedom – Depending on the temporary agreement you commit to, you may be exempt from certain company policies and have more freedom to work as you please.
  • Introductions – Temporary jobs are a great way to introduce yourself to a company and lobby for a full-time position. It’s like a months-long job interview.
  • Networking – Working a variety of temporary helps you cultivate professional contacts you can use to support your long-term career goals.
  • Enhancement – If you want to pick up a new skill/experience, taking a temporary job can be an appealing alternative to more education. They also help you bolster your resume.

Cons

  • Unpredictability – Temporary employees can face uncertainty about how long a position will last and whether or not it will be renewed.
  • No Benefits – Don’t count on temporary jobs to offer you benefits of any kind.
  • Repetition – Temporary workers are usually asked to work on one task or project over and over. This can prove to be very mundane.
  • Impermanence – the minute one temporary job ends you will have to find another. That means your job search is essentially endless.

Which type of job is right for you? Work with the staffing specialists at The Concorde Group to help you find both.

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Interviewing Tips for Looking for Company Culture Fit in a Candidate

October 8th, 2013

May 17

Each company has a culture that is unique to the business, industry, and objectives. When recruiting, not only are you looking for someone who has the right educational background and skills required for the position, but also who fits in best with your company culture. If candidates don’t mesh well with the corporate culture, it can be hard for them to feel comfortable in their new job. A poor culture fit can also make daily business operations more difficult for everyone else.

Here are some behavioral interviewing tips you can use to be sure a candidate has what it takes to fit in well with the company culture.

Uncover a Past Unsatisfactory Company Culture

During the interview, ask the candidate about the worst company they ever worked for. Make sure the question is specific to the company culture and work environment. By asking this question, you are right away discovering where they don’t want to work and will not fit in well. If their worst experience is close to your company culture, you know immediately it isn’t a good fit. However, if it is quite different from how your company is run, then you gain some insight.

For example, if a candidate didn’t like working in a fast paced office, but you have a low key and smaller office, the candidate may be a good fit. On the other hand, if the candidate appears to be too rigid in what they expect from an employer, this could signal performance problems and a poor fit with the company culture.

Find Out About Preferred Work Environment

Another way to learn more about where the candidate feels the most comfortable is by asking directly where they would prefer to work. Since the candidate has likely become familiar with what your work environment is, you can assume they would be happy there if they are applying for the job. But there might be things in your culture they are not aware of. Ask flat out what types of work environments or the collaboration conditions they best excel in.

Ask About Difficult Situations

Finding out more about the candidate’s personality traits and work habits is important to find out if they will fit in with your company culture. One way to do that is asking about difficult situations they have had in previous positions, and how they handled it. Try to phrase the question in a way to find out about difficulties with the company or environments, not with customers or clients.

How the candidate answers makes a large impact in determining if they are a good fit with your company. This lets you know if they tend to be someone to let others handle things or if they take the initiative. If the candidate prefers calm reasoning and compromise, or if they are more headstrong about their own ideals.

Lay Out Your Company Culture in Clear Terms

The last step of this process is always to outline what your company culture looks like and how the work environment is on a standard workday. If it is an extremely strict, business professional environment that doesn’t provide any personal time during the workday, be honest about that. If you allow a loose dress code and flexible work hours, indicate that as well. It helps both you and the candidate to decide if they would fit in well with the company, or not.

If you are looking for staffing agencies in Westchester NY, contact Concorde Personnel today.

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3 Tips on How to Use Social Media in Your Hiring Process

September 15th, 2013

June 9

Social media recruiting is on the rise as many hiring managers look to online networks to get in touch with quality candidates. There are millions of combined users on the top three social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter). The Undercover Recruiter featured a video that highlights some facts about how many people actually participate in social networks. Interestingly enough, nearly 85 percent of technology professionals use Facebook and another 41 percent use Twitter. This equates to millions of technology pros who are accessible by social networks – and this is just one industry that recruiters can tap into!

It’s clear that recruiters need to learn how to connect with social media users who could be excellent recruits for company growth. Hiring managers also need to become familiar with the leading social networks in order to better engage with and recruit candidates, because they are uniquely suited to this purpose. Read on for some tips to use social media effectively in your recruitment and hiring process.

Set up a professionally branded social media profile that’s consistent across all social networks.  

Your first stop in being successful with social media recruitment strategy is to develop a branded social media profile for your company. Your brand gives others an idea what your business stands for, what your corporate culture is like, and the types of candidates who will fit in well with these factors. Your brand may include your company logo and message, links to your company career web page, and imagery that displays your company mission and values in a consistent manner across all the networks you participate in.

Post open assignments, industry updates, and relevant company content on a regular basis.  

As part of a strategic recruiting effort, you can use social media to post job openings or links to your job openings. Add frequent updates about your company achievements within the industry you operate. Upload interesting content to your social networks frequently. Use social media to engage in conversation with others to build a following of passive and active candidates. The idea is to stay in front of potential individuals who may decide to come on board at some point in the future.

Seek out potential candidates using built in social search functions and niche industry groups.

Perhaps one of the best ways to engage with more candidates is to proactively seek them out using the many tools found on social networks. All social media types have built-in searchability which enables recruiters to search for professionals by industry, title, name, and even location.  Become active in niche groups for your industry and job seekers, adding relevant content and links to job openings. Use hashtags (#) on Twitter when posting jobs for your niche industry. Use LinkedIn recruitment tools for candidates to apply using their profile information.

Social media recruiting can be a rewarding way to reach out to more candidates who may have what it takes to become part of your company. Remember to use this as just another resource in your tool bag as a recruiter. Use caution when engaging with others on social networks and respect their privacy. Work with a temporary staffing agency that has a strong social media presence and can support your recruitment needs. Overall, social recruiting can provide many benefits for your business when used in the right ways.

If you are looking for staffing agencies in Westchester NY, contact Concorde today.

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